Passion for Hire

We’re frequently told to “do what we love”, but what happens when passion turns into work?

I started doing yoga several years ago, as a way to stay healthy, and be a better me. I went to teacher training for that same reason; looking at it as “yoga college”. Immediately upon graduating, however, yoga went from something I spent money on, to something I made money from. So how do we tow the line between passion and money? To which cause does ultimate loyalty lie?

I’ve joked for a long time now about how rockstars and yoga teachers are analogous. Both got into it for the love of what they do. Both have a message to share. Both book gigs. Both have groupies. Both rely on social media. Both merchandize. Both are susceptible to falling prey to a sense of entitlement regarding what they’re “worth”.

So what’s the price tag for passion these days anyways? I was talking to a highly talented musician friend the other day, who said that he plays shows because he loves playing shows (I know several who fall into this category). He’s willing to do it for free. It isn’t about the money, although he does get paid for gigs too.

We’ve all seen the results that ensue when a musician is doing what they do for the money. Trite songs. Uninspired performances; at sold-out stadiums. Disappointed fans. Dance, monkey, dance. Hmm. But the only move I seem to recall at the moment is the “Robot”.

I think the same holds true for us all, regardless of industry. Yes, we all have our mouths to feed, and our heads to roof. However, if your money maker also happens to be your source of passion and inspiration, it’s important to check in with whether you’re doing what you do for the giving, or for the getting. Because in that instance, something more important is in jeopardy than your bottom line – your peace of mind. Which is likely why you became passionate about it in the first place.

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